A downpour did not deter media members from attending a recent press briefing in a Modesto almond orchard highlighting a groundwater recharge project funded by the Almond Board of California (ABC) in partnership with UC Davis and Sustainable Conservation.
The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is offering up to three years of financial incentives through its Environmental Quality Incentive Program (EQIP) to almond and walnut growers who adopt harvest equipment shown to reduce particulate matter (dust).
The Almond Conference in December, as always, provided a wealth of information to help growers fine-tune their production practices with updated techniques and state-of-the-art tools.
Launched at The Almond Conference last December and detailed in the previous California Almonds Outlook newsletter, new Accelerated Innovation Management (AIM) initiatives will address the needs of almond farming, harvesting and processing into the future.
With trees in bloom and bees buzzing throughout the orchard, growers and all pollination stakeholders should be aware of practices and strategies that balance bee and crop health.
In a recent Almond Update, Almond Board of California Director of North America, Molly Spence, shares findings from a recent almond nutritional study looking at almonds and families.
The 2016 crop is right around the corner, which means work must be done now to prevent navel orangeworm infestations.
The Almond Board of California’s (ABC’s) newly adopted Accelerated Innovation Management (AIM) program focuses on the innovative almond farming practices that will be required to meet the future needs of the California Almond industry, as well as the consumer, the community and the planet.
If you’ve ever thought of serving the California Almond industry, the opportunity is here — you have until Jan. 20, 2016, to file a nomination petition for two independent grower member positions and two independent grower alternate positions on the Board of Directors for Almond Board of California.
There are many challenges facing U.S. agriculture in the year ahead when it comes to transportation issues. The high value of the U.S. dollar compared to other currencies results in U.S. exports costing more than exports supplied by other countries.

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